Urban poverty in Guatemala
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Urban poverty in Guatemala

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Published by Agency for International Development, Office of Housing in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Guatemala,
  • Guatemala.

Subjects:

  • Poor -- Guatemala.,
  • Guatemala -- Economic conditions -- 1945-1985.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementAgency for International Development, Office of Housing.
ContributionsUnited States. Agency for International Development. Office of Housing.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC144.Z9 P627
The Physical Object
Pagination339 p. in various pagings, [7] p. of plates :
Number of Pages339
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3919569M
LC Control Number81600777

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In , over half of all Guatemalans—about million people—lived in poverty, with about 16% living in extreme poverty. Guatemala rates among the worst in Latin America and the Caribbean for life expectancy, infant mortality and maternal mortality and while the education sector has made progress there are still important biases against the poor. This book lays out in detail the ways in which present measures of poverty underestimate urban poverty and presents the data on urban poverty and inequality, and especially urban health deprivations. It demonstrates that research policy and action to improve the . Poverty. According to figures in , million people are still living under poverty and a third of this figure, or 2 million people, are struggling with extreme poverty.. Moreover, despite a fall in extreme poverty during the s, Guatemala’s dependency on exports and susceptibility to global price shocks such as the world coffee crisis and natural disasters such as the Tropical Storm. The rural-urban migration has increased massively in the last two decades, causing San Salvador’s population to increase almost 40% in that time. The migrants have set up their homes closer and closer to the riverbanks and ravines that traverse the city.

Poverty is not having enough material possessions or income for a person's needs. Poverty may include social, economic, and political elements.. Absolute poverty is the complete lack of the means necessary to meet basic personal needs, such as food, clothing and shelter. The threshold at which absolute poverty is defined is always about the same, independent of the person's permanent location. In , over half of all Guatemalans-about million people-lived in poverty, with about 16% living in extreme poverty. Guatemala rates among the worst in Latin America and the Caribbean for life expectancy, infant mortality and maternal mortality and while the education sector has made progress there are still important biases against the poor. She has recently co-authored (with David Satterthwaite): Urban Poverty in the Global South: Scale and Nature and Reducing Urban Poverty in the Global South. Noah Nathan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government at Harvard University, where he studies political behavior and political parties in new democracies in Africa. This book argues that an examination of the food system and food security provides a valuable lens to interrogate urban poverty. Chapters examine the linkages between poverty, urban food systems and local governance with a focus on case studies from three smaller or secondary cities in Africa: Kisumu (Kenya), Kitwe (Zambia) and Epworth (Zimbabwe).

In this book, Xiaojun Zhang, a professor of Sociology in Tsinghua University, collects studies of various vulnerable groups in urban China, revealing the real life situations of the urban poor and analyzing the underlying reasons that cause urban poverty. Poverty is often discussed in terms of absolute deprivation and relative deprivation. Guatemala has the largest economy in Central America. The private sector generates about 85 percent of the GDP, and government involvement in the economy is fairly minimal. The service sector is the largest sector of the Guatemalan economy, making up 62 percent of . Get this from a library! Health and poverty in Guatemala. [Michele Gragnolati; Alessandra Marini; World Bank. Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office. Human Development Sector Unit.] -- Unlike many other countries in Latin America, Guatemala is only at the beginning of the demographic and epidemiological transition. The population is young, is growing rapidly, and is still primarily. Urban poverty, food security and climate change. urban poverty and urban food insecurity to ex plore how the impacts of climate change are. In Guatemala, a country where almost half the.